Category Archives: News and Views

AeroFarms Grows Plants Without Soil For Cities of the Future | Bloomberg

imagesAeroFarms has developed a vertical farming system that can grow organic baby leafy greens in urban settings. They’re doing it using aeroponics — the process of growing plants in mist without any soil — and plan to launch a branded product from a new 80,000-square-foot warehouse in Newark, New Jersey. AeroFarms CEO and Co-Founder David Rosenberg talks to Bloomberg’s Sam Grobart about how the company is bringing their produce mainstream for Bloomberg’s “The Year Ahead: 2015″ series.

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Why a Phone Call Is Better Than an Email Usually | Entrepreneur

imagesThis isn’t going to be about efficiency. Sometimes the phone is a more efficient way to communicate than e-mail, and sometimes it isn’t. If two people leave a dozen messages on each other’s voice mail, that’s a lot less efficient than sending a single e-mail and reading a reply to it.

No, this isn’t going to be about how telephonic communication helps you work faster. This is about how the phone makes you work better. Because unlike e-mail, the phone forces you to be more emphatic, more accurate, more honest.

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Amazon Vows to Run on 100 Percent Renewable Energy | WIRED

Apple made the pledge. So did Google and Facebook. But Amazon stayed silent.

Over the past few years, Apple, Google, and Facebook pledged to run their online empires on renewable energy, and considering how large these empires have become—how many data centers and machines are now required to keep them going—this was a vital thing. But despite pressure from the likes of Greenpeace, the environmental activism organization, the other big internet name, Amazon, didn’t budge.

That all changed on Wednesday. With a post on its website, Amazon’s cloud computing division—Amazon Web Services—said it has a “long-term commitment to achieve 100 percent renewable energy usage for our global infrastructure footprint.”

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Weekly Economic Update | LAEDC

v.18 n. 45 – Released November 19, 2014

This Week’s Headlines:

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Fatburger: How One Burger Chain Profits From Turmoil Abroad | Businessweek

Political protests, disease outbreaks, terrorist campaigns—U.S. business owners considering expanding internationally would be forgiven for deciding to stay at home. But name a tumultuous spot abroad—Hong Kong, Iraq, Egypt—and Andy Wiederhorn has probably opened a burger shop there in the past seven years.

Wiederhorn has taken his Los Angeles-based franchise, Fatburger, from a struggling also-ran to a $125 million company by opening in 32 countries since 2007. He has 200 international locations now and an additional 350 in development, including in places rocked by unrest, such as Tunisia and Libya. Despite the advances of Islamic State, a second store in Iraq is also in the works.

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  5 Intangibles Your Ecommerce Business Should Be Focusing On, But Isn’t | Getentrepreneurial.com

At any given time, there are thousands of small business entrepreneurs looking to create a meaningful presence on the web. As you read this, some traditional businesses are finding a new home online, some “purely online” ecommerce businesses are taking birth, and the mad rush for every website out there to go mobile is only intensifying.

If you are an entrepreneur just starting out, you’ll eventually face what is called “information paralysis” – the sheer weight of information that threatens to freeze you. You aren’t responsible for this information overload, but your best bet is to absorb what matters to you and stay committed to make your ecommerce business work.

Pulling out your new ecommerce site from the hidden corners of the web and taking to stupendous popularity and profits is sweat-inducing, scary hard work. Slap focus together with assiduousness and your ecommerce business will see new light.

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Toyota Keeps Piling Into Fuel Cells As It Runs Away From EVs | Forbes

Toyota keeps on running toward hydrogen fuel cells and away from all-electric vehicles in what amounts to the most decisive strategy in the auto industry for the future of alternative power trains.

At the Los Angeles auto show, Toyota executives planned to elaborate on the company’s deepening investments in fuel-cell vehicles, after a weekend announcement that it would begin selling next year a model called “Mirai” — Japanese for “future” — that will travel 300 miles on a hydrogen tank and can be refilled in less than five minutes. The car, Toyota has said previously, will go on sale in Japan in April for about $60,000 and be introduced in the U.S. and Europe a few months later.

The company’s embrace of fuel cells reminds some observers of other significant moments of commitment for Toyota over the decades, including in 1989 when it launched the Lexus luxury brand in the United States and in 1997, when it started selling Prius gasoline-electric hybrids. Both moves redefined the American auto industry in different ways.

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