Tag Archives: seo

3 Ways to Survive the Coming Social Bust | SmallBusinessNewz

Compared to the last boom/bust technology cycle that culminated with the dot com crash of 2000, the social-era combatants are in an even more precarious position. Back then, the engine of the expansion was e-commerce, which at least generated revenue (although clearly not at ROI sufficient to save Pets.com, Webvan.com, Boo.com and legions of other online ghosts). Last time, success and failure was driven as much by expense control as revenue generation, and the huge influx of public market financing through IPOs allowed start-up companies to essentially trade dollars back and forth in a giant shell game.

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The Next Internet? Inside PARC’s Vision of Content Centric Networking | Xconomy

The fundamental idea behind Content Centric Networking is that to retrieve a piece of data, you should only have to care about what you want, not where it’s stored. Rather than transmitting a request for a specific file on a specific server, a CCN-based browser or device would simply broadcast its interest in that file, and the nearest machine with an authentic copy would respond.

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The Anti-Google Movement is Gaining Momentum | Site Reference – Internet Marketing Articles

I have been always providing “great content” and got myriads of natural organic links plus all those things Google demands you to do. All that white hat SEO stuff people recommend to you. It doesn’t work though. Yes, I said it.

White hat SEO does not work.

You can be the whitest hat alive like I was on this blog and in the end you get a kick in your guts. Black hat SEO gets you penalized even faster but white hat SEO does as well.

The only thing that works is SEO 2.0 as in my original concept. You have to become independent of Google. You need to establish an audience on social media and direct traffic alias subscribers and returning visitors. Google is not a reliable traffic source whatsoever.

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INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now | Business Insider

Maybe this is the reason General Motors went “mental” and pulled its Facebook ad budget.

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Rand Fishkin of SEOMoz Challenges the Web to Take Down His Site | Site Reference – Internet Marketing Articles

According to Google’s original guidelines, it said…

“Can competitors harm ranking? There’s nothing a competitor can do to harm your ranking or have your site removed from our index. If you’re concerned about another site linking to yours, we suggest contacting the webmaster of the site in question. Google aggregates and organizes information published on the web; we don’t control the content of these pages.”

In November, Google changed its tune a little bit…

“Can competitors harm ranking? There’s ALMOST nothing a competitor can do to harm your ranking or have your site removed from our index. If you’re concerned about another site linking to yours, we suggest contacting the webmaster of the site in question. Google aggregates and organizes information published on the web; we don’t control the content of these pages.”

Did anyone catch the slight difference in this new entry? You don’t have to be a professional writer to see this one.

Then, on March 14th…

“Google works hard to prevent other webmasters from being able to harm your ranking or have your site removed from our index. If you’re concerned about another site linking to yours, we suggest contacting the webmaster of the site in question. Google aggregates and organizes information published on the web; we don’t control the content of these pages.”

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Brains And Bots Deep Inside Yahoo’s CORE Grab A Billion Clicks | Fast Company

The company started work on a powerful personalization algorithm four years ago. Now it’s paying dividends. The system generates 45,000 totally unique versions of the Today module every five minutes. (All five screenshots in this post were taken within minutes of each other, using different Yahoo accounts.)

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The Death of Free | Peter Mehit

The New York Times recent announcement of a metered online pay model got me waxing nostalgic. In the early 2000s I participated in the launch of an internet services firm.  Based in Seattle, we occupied an entire floor of an office building in the Queen Anne district.  Most of the staff were in their early twenties. Their chief attributes were enthusiasm,  their knowledge of html, perl and how to come to work loaded and look normal. During the day, they looked productive. At night, visions of stock options danced in their heads.

I took over management of the development group well after a number of critical design decisions had been made. One of them was to base the design of the system on open source software created by people who do so for bragging rights instead of pay. In the developer’s workspace, which was part play room, part college dorm, I would frequently debate with the team the lack of revenue that open systems generated. The response invariably was that once people understood the value of the product through free versions, they would be willing to pay.
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