Tag Archives: start ups

4 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Help Save the Economy | Allbusiness.com

Forget about the politicians in Washington and don’t count on Corporate America to get our struggling economy going — it’s America’s entrepreneurs that will prove to be the saviors. American entrepreneurs, through their creativity, innovation, and willingness to embrace risk, are the real engines that power our economy.

So often we look to the huge, multinational corporations as the drivers and guardians of our economy when the truth is the millions of small businesses across America deserve the credit. A strong, vibrant economy is the result of America’s entrepreneurs embracing the risk of self-reliance and venturing out to create their own opportunities. New small business startups create over three million new jobs each year. The solution to getting this country back on its feet and moving in a positive direction won’t happen because of the government. It requires the fruitful minds and determined drive of everyday citizens who enthusiastically embrace risk and begin the entrepreneurial journey.

Want to be part of the solution? Here are four ways that entrepreneurs can help revitalize our sagging economy:

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4 Things Remarkable Startups Have In Common | Entrepreneur.com

Why do some start-ups succeed and others don’t? Here’s a hint: It doesn’t have to do with if an idea is good or bad. Indeed, the successful entrepreneurs are able to run with amazing concepts and pivot other when needing. There are a few more tried and true principles that can contribute to the success of your new company. Among other things, these are four things remarkable start-ups have in common.

1. Founders are insanely passionate about the idea. Don’t start a business without passion. You won’t be able to see it through if you are not really into your idea. Founders of most successful start-ups started searching for solutions to a problem they cared about and made it their focus.

“You have to be burning with an idea, or a problem, or a wrong that you want to right. If you’re not passionate enough from the start, you’ll never stick it out,” Steve Jobs has said.

Founders with great passion tend to inspire others to greater success, and they look out for those traits in new hires. According to best-selling authors and workplace strategists Kevin and Jackie Freiberg, passion enables innovation and creativity and makes employees want to stay in their jobs and contribute, even when they’re not feeling their best.

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9 Critical Mistakes That Can Kill Most Startup Businesses | Allbusiness.com

While many startup businesses are filled with bright-eyed company evangelicals, the reality is that the odds are against you. Harvard Business School researcher Shikhar Ghosh found that 75 percent of all startups fail, which means that new companies have to rise up with caution if they plan to survive the first few years. This translates to running on a budget even when your productivity and sales are booming, ignoring deadly business fads, and taking fewer risks.

These dire statistics shouldn’t scare entrepreneurs away from new business ventures, but they should help us rethink our current approach to startup management. With new tech companies blossoming and wilting in cities like San Francisco, Seattle, and Cambridge, it’s easy for startup founders to get discouraged. Take a look at these massive mistakes new companies make and learn to avoid them early.

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The SBA Offers Sweeteners to Encourage More Small Loans | Businessweek

The changes mean small business owners borrowing $150,000 will no longer have to come up with $2,550 in upfront fees at the time the loan closes.

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The Consultant’s Dilemma: People Can’t Say No | Peter Mehit

mehWe are coming up on a decade in our own business. We have worked with thousands of clients and many times that number of prospects. As independent business people, our survival depends on our ability to forecast and close work. We have a very high close rate once we’re presenting, especially in person. This has been achieved through careful study of human nature and at a high cost.

As a consultant, you need to make the prospecting cycle as tight as possible so you are not chasing leads that won’t go anywhere. We began to experience greater success when we understood the following principle: Most people can’t say no.

I don’t mean this in the sense that they will buy from you if you overcome objections or demonstrate value. Most prospects know very quickly if they see value in what you’re doing and will buy. Our experience has been the best engagements result from connections that form quickly or, if there are delays because of a competitive procurement process, you are continually building a tighter relationship as it goes on. Absent this, you are likely waiting for a ‘no’.

The reason for this, my partner and I believe, is that most people hate the idea of rejection and hence are hesitant to do it to other people. I, for one, appreciate having my attention and effort liberated by a firm ‘no’. I am now free to begin the hunt for a new client, sometimes with lessons learned. But the slow ‘no’, or worse, the ‘we’re thinking about it’ just takes up mental and emotional cycles that are better spent elsewhere.

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Dr. Richard Sudek Interview | Peter Mehit

Below is the transcript of the full interview I conducted with Dr. Richard Sudek, Director of Chapman University’s Leatherby Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics. The center is nationally recognized as a leader in the field and Chapman has produced a number of notable entrepreneurs, including our client, Frank Delgadillo, creator of the Ambiguous and Comune action wear lines.

Excerpts from this interview appeared in Impact (formerly Caypen) magazine in both their online and print editions.

Q: Can you give us some background on the Leatherby Center and what you do here?

Sudek: I’m the Director of the Leatherby Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics.

PM: What is your background?

Sudek: I had my own computer company, built starting with $250 and sold it, so I’m not your typical academic. What I’m really trying to do is change the entrepreneurial ecosystem here in OrangeCounty. The entrepreneurial ecosystem is poorly connected from my perception. We’d like Chapman to be involved in helping connect it. We’d like Chapman to be the place where entrepreneurs, inventors and investors meet and collaborate.

Most of our energy is outward facing rather inward facing.

One of the things to point out is that Chapman one of the best kept secrets here in OrangeCounty. We’re a top 50 business school. We have a Nobel prize winner in economics. Our entrepreneurship program is ranked 13th by BusinessWeek. Because I wanted to cross connect the university, we built this thing called ESUN, Entrepreneur Student University Network. Originally it was designed to be small, so we started with the local schools; Cal Tech. USC, UCLA, Loyola, Pepperdyne, UCI, Fullerton and Claremont McKenna to try to cross connect our centers which we’re starting to do.

The thing that really launched this is we created this competition called California Dreaming. And we brought in other schools such as Oklahoma, BYU, Berkeley and Hawaii, etc and created a $100,000 business plan competition that we have in April. Next year it will be a $200,000. It’s going actually be two different competitions a business plan competition and fast pitch competition. Microsemi will be the anchor sponsor, as they were last year. The idea is to get students in front of investors, not just to win cash. I brought in VCs and angels from the bay area and local VCs and angels.

One of the teams, BYU, who won the competition, got some equity funding from this in late April. So that’s the idea is to get students connected to that.

PM: So you’re trying to build the hub for this kind of activity here?

Sudek: Yes. Now this reaches outward across different states so the idea is the help students in general although focused on Chapman, OrangeCounty, Southern California, going out from there.

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Interview – Amir Banifatemi | Peter Mehit

AmirAmir Banifatemi is founder of K5 Accelerator, which is based at ChapmanCollege’s e-Village. He has extensive experience developing start up and growth companies in many different markets but focuses primarily on healthcare, internet and media technologies. While he is focused keenly on developing value, he also has an eye toward projects that have significant technological breakthroughs and significant social and economic impact.

Mehit: You’ve been quoted that the center of gravity in OrangeCounty has been around real estate and finance resulting in a very careful and staid culture. What would you like to see changed?

Amir: I would try to improve a certain number of things, one of those would be more collaboration. I think the history of OrangeCounty and how people are disbursed does not promote synergies. Unfortunately, distance makes it difficult for people to meet and collaborate on projects, except on big projects.

Further if you look historically, at San Francisco or other places, when people get out of college, where do they go? They go to Hewlett Packard or the Fairchild or Intel but what do they do here? They go to a real estate company or title company. The appropriate employment environment is lacking.

Finally, people are focused on cash today instead of cash tomorrow. Your attitude, your investment of time and resource in collaboration and how you view society and community are different if you looking at cash tomorrow.

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