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Stupid Management Tricks – The Vanishing Fourth Floor | Los Angeles Times

When They Hit the Ceiling, These Execs Just Move to the Next Floor

June 21, 1999|ROY RIVENBURG
Quadrophobia Bureau: We’ve heard of buildings where the elevators don’t list a 13th floor. Now there seems to be a jinx on the fourth floor, as well. At the corporate headquarters of Hunt-Wesson Foods in Fullerton, for example, the entire fourth floor mysteriously vanished over Memorial Day weekend.

Apparently, company bigwigs decided that changing the number of the floor–which houses all the executive suites–would stop employees from referring to management as “the fourth floor” (as in “You won’t believe what the fourth floor did today” or “Naturally, the layoffs don’t affect the fourth floor”).

So presto, they turned it into the fifth floor. The elevators now stop at 1, 2, 3 and . . . 5, all room numbers on the floor no longer begin with a “4” and corporate directories were reprinted to eliminate any trace of the number that dare not speak its name.

We wanted to ask Hunt-Wesson if it also plans to refer to the Fourth of July as July 5, but we were told that the company’s lone spokeswoman was on the road (perhaps in her new five-wheel-drive sport utility vehicle) and unavailable for comment.

Meanwhile, employees have begun referring to management as “the fifth floor,” and the Beatles are now known as the Fab Five.

Lydia was a contractor of Hunt Wesson when this occurred.  She and her friend ran to the renumbered building.  ‘GTFO’, said Lydia’s friend as they read the numbers in the elevator: ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’, 5′.  – Ed

Urban Outfitters wants full-time employees to work for free | Business Insider

As the holiday season approaches, Urban Outfitters is hoping that its employees are in the giving spirit.

Gawker published an email asking the full-time employees at URBN, Urban Outfitters’ parent company based in Philadelphia, to work without pay during five weekend days in October.

The email explains that October is the busiest month of the year for URBN (which houses Urban Outfitters, Free People, and Anthropologie), and therefore, URBN needs its employees’ help.

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What’s Your Most Productive Work Time? | Business News Daily

If you’re like many of today’s office workers, you begin your day between 8 and 9 a.m., end between 5 and 6 p.m., and spend the eight or nine hours in between juggling meetings, conference calls, emails and project deadlines — along with a few trips to the coffee maker to keep you alert and productive.

Sound familiar? If it does, then you probably also know that, despite your best efforts (and caffeine intake), you’re not always at your peak when you’re trudging through the daily stream of work. All 9-to-5ers go through productivity slumps during the workday, and yet they still try to power through and keep working, even if it means substandard output. But why do they do it?

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What Your Flaky Behavior Is Really Telling People | Entrepreneur

There are certainly no shortage of reasons — or excuses — as to why you needed to cancel a meeting 30 minutes before it was scheduled, or why you were 20 minutes late for a call or appointment. I know what you’re thinking: “but I was super busy” or “my previous investor meeting went long.”

The reality is you’re going to be judged by your actions, and your actions are saying the wrong things.

Look, I’ve lived in the trenches of startup warfare — actually I’m in them right now while building two companies simultaneously — so I can both honestly and accurately say that I understand that things get crazy. But I must also say that it’s incredibly important to effectively manage your time and schedule, at least if you don’t want to burn dozens of bridges through your journey, which will only make things more difficult in both the short and long runs.

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What Advertisers Are Getting Wrong About Programmatic | Adweek


Current gig Vp of strategy at TubeMogul

Previous gig Head of technology at Ikon Communications

Age 35

Adweek: Describe your role as vp of strategy

Phil Cowlishaw: It’s a little bit like Navy SEALs. I take a high view of our most important strategic accounts and then deep dive into them to get a deep understanding of exactly what business drivers will make a difference for them and then how TubeMogul, the platform, can deliver this. My job is to lead a team that helps these accounts, to truly align their business models with our software features. At the end of the day, it’s ultimately helping them get the most value out of our platform. It’s really about how they can pull the triggers inside of our platform to shift more product or brand awareness.

What clients have you been working with?

L’Oréal USA, Jose Cuervo, Mondelez, Allstate, Heineken, Quiznos, and Lenovo.

What trends do you see emerging in digital advertising?

There’s an increased interest in this space on the brand side. We’re seeing brands trying to understand exactly what programmatic is and how it could potentially help their business. We’re seeing a significant shift into the programmatic space and a drive and adoption by big brand advertisers and their agencies to try and understand the power of programmatic, especially in online video, and how it can drive business results.

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Google Is Planning For A Zero-Waste, Circular Economy | Fast Company

The current economy is built on waste—dig up some materials, turn that into a product, ship it to an “end user” who eventually tosses it in the trash. But that’s starting to change.

Google is one of the latest mega-corporations to commit to the principles of a circular economy—one that keeps “technical nutrients” like plastic and silicon out of the landfill, and trims out wasted water, energy, food, and land.

“Our goal is to embed circular economic principles into the fabric of Google’s infrastructure, operations, and culture,” says Kate Brandt, Google’s sustainability lead. “What that means is that we’ll be focusing on opportunities wherever possible to eradicate waste through smart design—at our data centers, in our kitchens, on our campuses, in all we do around the world.”

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Weekly Economic Update |LAEDC

v.19 n. 41 – Released October 5, 2015

This Week’s Headlines: