Monthly Archives: July 2009

I’m a PC, an Angry, Caustic PC. | Emails From Crazy People

An actual e-mail from Bill Gates to his crew about “Windows Usability Systematic degradation flame”. Cool. He even tells them he’s going to trash them in the Subject line.

Best Quote:

“The lack of attention to usability represented by these experiences blows my mind.” Turns out that Bill has had all of the same problems we have with Windows.

The take away is this, at a certain point, some businesses get so big, nobody can really control them and it’s up to the systems and culture that formed during its growth phase to steer it in maturity.

The same applies to governments too. We’re having quite a usability issue with ours.

It’s a great article. Read it here.

Is Bank of America Overcompensating? | New York Magazine

This is unbridled anger. Even the late World Trade Center, universally reviled for its boxy design, wasn’t accused of being a cover for sexual short comings.

I guess people don’t like it when you take a lot of money from them and then build a monument to your own greatness.

Read Article

Twitter for Business | Flite New Media

“When I first heard about Twitter—a tool for instantly broadcasting the minutiae of your day and following the trifles of others—I couldn’t imagine a bigger waste of time.”

If this was your first reaction, check out this article.

Read Article

FACEBOOK FAIL: How to Use Facebook Privacy Settings and Avoid Disaster | Mashable

A great article about segmenting your friend lists to keep your personal and business life separate.

Read Article

How to Get Started With Linked In | BNET

This is a great article for those trying to navigate the Linked In world. Pay special attention to the side bar “Social Networking for Old Farts”

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Stimulus News Digest | SBA

This newsletter details the various firms and entities that have received stimulus package funds and what they are being used for.

Read the newsletter here

More Advertisers Turning To Internet | Mike Sachoff

By Mike Sachoff – Thu, 07/23/2009 – 13:59

Relying less on print

The majority (92%) of advertisers are using Internet advertising in their media campaigns followed by print advertising at 88 percent, according to a new LinkedIn Research Network/Harris Poll.

At the same time, less than half are using radio advertising (46%), television advertising (46%) and mobile advertising (39%). The Harris poll found there is a regional difference as advertisers in the South are more likely to use radio advertising (57%) and television advertising (56%) while those in the West are least likely to use both (39% each).

Among those advertisers who are using each of these types of media, there is a difference in the level of usage since last year. Three-quarters of those who use Internet advertising (74%) say they are incorporating it more often while 69 percent of those who use mobile advertising are using it more often compared to a year ago. Unsurprisingly, the largest drop is with print advertising as half (49%) of those who use it are using it less often compared to a year ago while 41 percent are using it the same amount.
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Say It Ain’t So! Taco Bell Dog Dies | ABC News

Her bug eyes and sweet face captured the hearts of millions of fast food enthusisats.

Photo: Yo Quiero No More: Taco Bell Spokes-Chihuahua Dies at 15: Famous for Her Taco Bell Commercials, Gidget Also Acted Alongside Reese Witherspoon

In this August 1998 file photo, Gidget the Chihuahua is featured in a Taco Bell advertisement. More than 10 years after her face first graced a “Yo Quiero Taco Bell” ad, marketing’s top Chihuahua has died at 15.

(Taco Bell/AP Photo)

But more than 10 years after her face first graced a “Yo Quiero Taco Bell” ad, marketing’s top chihuahua has died at 15 from a stroke.

Read complete article here.

Another jobless recovery? | Greg McBride, CFA – Bankrate.com

Another jobless recovery?

Wednesday, July 22
Posted 11 a.m. Eastern

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s appearance before the House Financial Services Committee yesterday lacked any unexpected revelations. One point in his prepared remarks did catch my attention, however.

“Although the unemployment rate is projected to peak at the end of this year, the projected declines in 2010 and 2011 would still leave unemployment well above FOMC participants’ views of the longer-run sustainable rate.”

Reading between the lines, Bernanke seems to suggest we’re in for another jobless recovery. My own opinion is that it will be the mother of all jobless recoveries. Sure hope I’m wrong.

Regarding the economy: On July 31, the initial estimate of second quarter economic output, affectionately known as Gross Domestic Product, or GDP, will be released. There is a possibility that the economy, either based on initial estimates or subsequent revisions, will eke out some growth.

Now, let’s not get too far out over our skis but be cautious about interpreting this if it should come to pass. Here’s why: Any growth posted by the U.S. economy will largely be due to a shrinking trade deficit, as imports (what we buy) have fallen much faster than exports (what we sell). So bottom line, any growth in the U.S. economy during the second quarter is more testament to the resilience of foreign consumers than it is American consumers.

For more of Greg McBride’s posts, go to: Fed Blog: Making sense of the Federal Reserve.

When, Oh When, Will HELP Be WANTED? | NYTimes.com

by Louis Uchitelle

Question: Where is the recovery coming from? This article adds some fresh perspective.

“But this time is clearly different. The pent-up demand is not present — not with 6.46 million jobs gone in just 18 months and hundreds of billions of dollars in wages extinguished. Credit is harder than ever to get for those who might want to spend again, and there are fewer and fewer spenders. People who do have jobs are saving (not spending) more of their incomes than they have in years, trying to replenish wealth lost in the stock market and in the declining value of their homes.”

Read Article: When, Oh When, Will HELP Be WANTED? – NYTimes.com.