Why Does the Moon Turn Red During a Total Lunar Eclipse? | Live Science


An oversized ruby-colored sphere rising in the sky as a total lunar eclipse turns the normally pallid moon scarlet is enough to make some people swoon. And perhaps with good reason, as the fiery glow is the most dramatic of the three types of lunar eclipses (the other two are called partial and penumbral).

In addition, perfection is a must: A total lunar eclipse happens only when the sun, Earth and moon are perfectly lined up.

So when the moon tiptoes into the outer portion of Earth’s shadow, becoming totally bathed in the darkest part of that shadow, why isn’t the result a “lights out” for the sky? Why instead does the moon become engulfed in a light-orange to blood-red glow?

Read More

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s