Category Archives: Case Studies

Detroit-Made Bicycles Are Taking Over Bike-Share Programs | Bloomberg

The Detroit Bikes factory sits on the West Side of the city near scattered abandoned homes and a junkyard full of rusted car parts. Inside, workers are taking test rides through the 50,000-square-foot facility on a fleet of freshly assembled bicycles destined for New York’s Citi Bike bike-share program. On foot, founder Zak Pashak, 36, dodges the riders, navigating a path around the chaotic floor and holding forth on the virtues of American-made chromoly steel—which, in case you’re not a metallurgist, is lighter and stronger than standard steel and is what Pashak uses in his house line. He stops and points to the loading dock, where a tractor-trailer waits to haul the bikes more than 600 miles to Citi Bike headquarters in Brooklyn. “This was my dream when we got the factory—watching semis drive away at the end of the day,” Pashak says.

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A Dyslexic Entrepreneur Says His Disability Helped Him Build A $3.6M Company | Forbes

Stan Gloss, 60, is cofounder and CEO of BioTeam, a consulting firm that designs computer systems and networks for the life sciences market. The 14-year-old company has both public and private sector clients, including the National Institutes of Health , the Centers for Disease Control, Biogen and Regeneron. While Gloss is based in Middleton, MA, his 18 employees all work from their homes in eight cities across the country, including New York, Pittsburgh, Austin and Gainesville, FLA. Last year BioTeam logged $3.6 million in revenue. Gloss has fought a lifelong battle with dyslexia, managing to become a college professor and cycle through four other jobs before starting BioTeam. In this condensed and edited interview, he describes how he learned to make the most of his disability and why he thinks dyslexics can become successful entrepreneurs.

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This Company Offers One-Stop Shopping For Artisanal Food | Entrepreneur

In 2009, three software engineers, a CFO and an HR exec came up with a savory idea: They would create a platform that lets shoppers make purchases from multiple artisan food producers and have everything delivered in a single order, along with certain big-brand staples.

“To be successful, we knew we had to work with artisans in each city and build an online farmers market filled with local products,” explains Lior Lavy, co-founder and COO of Dallas-based Artizone.

Today the company works with hundreds of purveyors who sell everything from pancake mix to sea salt in three markets. We talked to Lavy about how he’s helping small food businesses expand their reach.

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The Basics of How I Built a Seven-Figure Business Without Employees | Entrepreneur

There is a lot to be said for those rare few that possess the ability to create huge companies with hundreds or thousands of employees that are all just ecstatic to be at work. It is exceptionally difficult and equally as impressive, which is why they end up taking up space on the front page of a major magazine or journal.

Although it appears flashy and glamorous, particularly with the amount of celebrity that todays super entrepreneurs wield, there is a tremendous amount of flexibility that is lost, almost by default, once you pass a certain size. Now, not only am I not one of those few, but I really don’t want to be.

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This Guy Sold His Startup for $575 Million in Cash — And Gets to Keep Every Penny | Entrepreneur

On Tuesday, the dating website Plenty of Fish got acquired by Match Group, an IAC/InterActive subsidiary that recently announced plans to go public later this year. Plenty of Fish sold to Match Group for $575 million in cash.

Markus Frind, 36, is the founder and CEO of the Vancouver-based Plenty of Fish.

Frind told Business Insider he started Plenty of Fish in 2003 “as a way to improve my résumé.”

“At the time there was a new programming language called ASP.NET, and I don’t like reading books, so I just went and created the site in two weeks, and then people started signing up, much to my surprise,” he said. “And it blew up from there. It wasn’t like I had a plan to create a dating site. It was just a side project I created that got really big.”

Frind, who was a developer before he founded Plenty of Fish, built the site without any venture-capital funding. He has retained complete ownership of the company, which has 75 employees.

“By the time I found out what VCs were, I was already making millions in profit, and I didn’t see the need to raise money because I wouldn’t know what to do with it,” he told Business Insider. “It was a profitable company, and there was no need to raise money.”

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How one Italian restaurant stands out in New York City | Mashable

It’s hard not to feel like you’re part of the warm and caring Italian family when you walk through the doors at West 56th street in New York City. Sal Scognomillo, the current head chef at Patsy’s Italian Restaurant is a jovial, sweet man who exudes a genuine contentment with life — hard to find in the city, where so many appear beaten down by how difficult it is to make it here.

Patsy’s Italian Restaurant has been around since 1944, when Pasquale Scognamillo opened up the location in Midtown. Since then, four generations of the family have worked in the kitchen preparing the food, and front of the house greeting guests and answering the phone. What really separates Patsy’s Italian Restaurant from the thousands of other restaurants in New York City is they make everyone who walks through the door feel like family.

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This Amazing Story of Courage and Leadership Stayed Secret for 50 Years | Inc

getty_458098480_970627970450096_60347Early in his career, Sir Nicholas Winton was a stockbroker; in later years, he worked for international relief organizations and other charities. But for 50 years, nobody knew his greatest achievement and contribution to humanity.

We often celebrate entrepreneurs for being dynamic business leaders. That’s a good thing, but entrepreneurship itself doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with making money. A professor at Harvard Business School put it best: it’s about the “pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.”

That’s why I’ve insisted that the best book about entrepreneurship has absolutely nothing to do with making money, and it’s why we can look at people who start nonprofits, or who assemble teams to accomplish amazing goals that have nothing to do with business–and call them great entrepreneurs.

Nicholas Winton was a truly great entrepreneur.

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