Tag Archives: networking

The List Tour

c59907_38a1af82f3234a82b36cc2c9068c22ad-mv2This is a One-Day intimate and interactive EXPERIENCE that brings the instructors who give you the tools to propel SELF + Business success. It is for the entrepreneur who is ready to use what’s in their Hand and Master IT – Creating an environment of continuous Profit!

The LIST Tour will focus in on content marketing, influence, capital and ways to use social media to your advantage. 

You will:   

  • Obtain information on how to become effective in your approach

  • Connect with entrepreneurs in your community

  • Leave with a plan on how to not only build your business but to keep it afloat

  • Be made accountable for your success

  • Included is continental breakfast and a fabulous LUNCH!

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7 Networking Hacks to Connect Better at Your Next Conference | Page19

Whether you have a job that entails regular conferences or you’re a freelancer who gets to work like a hermit, you’ll probably need to network at some point in your life. Here’s how to do it so everyone you touch gains from the experience.

It’s an indisputable fact that personal contacts open doors. One classic study, outlined in the book Getting a Job, showed that among the 282 men surveyed, 56 percent had found their jobs through personal contacts, whereas only 19 percent had found theirs through job advertisements and 10 percent through applications of their own initiative.

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Shy People Tend to Have This Coveted Leadership Skill | Entrepreneur.com

So, you’re never first to raise your hand during meetings and you’re uncomfortable schmoozing with strangers at networking events. Does that mean you’re doomed to fail in the business world?people

Not even close, shy one.

Those on the quiet side tend to be good listeners, giving them a serious edge over their more talkative, sometimes oversharing counterparts, says etiquette coach Jacqueline Whitmore, founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach.

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Linked In Beauty Pageant | Peter Mehit

InIf you’re on Linked In you’ve gotten them. The notes from people that you linked up with because you met them once at a mixer or because they knew someone you knew, or, let’s be honest, because you wanted to see that ‘500+ connections’ next to your name.

Can you

Some of them will eventually drop you a quick note about what they do and then ask you to endorse them. This must work, because a lot of people are doing it. I get at least one person a week asking me to endorse them. I don’t know them any better than the person ahead of me in line at Starbucks.

Now the truth is, if I wanted not to receive these e-mails, I would never link to people that I wouldn’t recommend. But I get at several requests to link every day, and the more links you have the more you get until it’s a never ending stream. If you’re half paying attention, the urge to just click ‘accept’ will get the best of you. Besides, the more people you’re linked to, the more influential you are, right?

But at the end of the process you have a another version of Facebook, where the connections don’t really mean anything, but you have a good count. It makes Linked In a beauty contest, not the connection engine as it was originally conceived as. Really, if you think about it, your real goal should be to have as few connections as possible, but of high enough quality and character that you would unreservedly recommend them at the drop of a hat. And those that you link with should be willing to do exactly the same for you. Otherwise, what is the point?

What is the point, indeed. Stories are told of collaborations that lead to millions of dollars in deals being done. Tales of jobs, sometimes unsolicited, being brought to people through their Linked In contacts. I do see that happening on a few of the groups that I belong to, rarely. For the most part, it’s a lot of noise as people try to stand out from an ever growing crowd.

Quantity is not quality. Quality begins when we make better choices. That starts with including who’s in and who’s not in our circle of business partners and associates.

LinkedIn Tips: 7 Things You’re Doing Wrong | Inc.com

Today, LinkedIn is the No. 1 social media platform for professionals. Estimates of professional participation in LinkedIn are as high as 83%.

But when I talked to one of my friends–social media expert Alexandra Gibson from OttoPilot Media–she told me that she sees too many professionals making a lot of mistakes. Here are the seven she sees most often.

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PEOPLE YOU SHOULD KNOW – Bill Ellermeyer | Peter Mehit

One of the first people we met when we began marketing in Orange County was Bill Ellermeyer. I met him at a mixer where I noticed the ever changing number and types of people speaking with him. Some younger, some older, people in hip hop regalia and guys in suits we’re engaged with him in conversation.

When I finally spoke  with him I noticed two things. First, I felt like I’d known the man for more than a few moments, and second, he was an incredible listener. How this listening manifested itself was he asked questions that got at what I was thinking, not just saying. Within a ten minute conversation, he had a good grasp of my business and gave me a road map of whom to speak with and where potential partners and clients might be found. All of this information was delivered with wit and enough political savvy that the relationships of the people we discussed became apparent.  It was a seminar. Then, as quick as it started it was over, both of us shaking hands and continuing to work the room.

This is what Bill Ellermeyer does. He sees patterns. He makes connections. He then takes that vision and applies it to his clients who are primarily executives exiting the corporate world in search of the next illusive job or in some cases coming to grips with the idea that the next position won’t be there for them at all.

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Business Networking and Sex (Not What You Think) | Dr. Ivan Misner

There have been a lot of books written about business networking and referral marketing. I’ve written quite a few of these myself. There have also been a lot of books written about the difference between men and women. However, it dawned on me that no one had ever made the effort to combine the two subjects. With that realization, a new book project was born.

Over a four-year period, more than 12,000 businesspeople participated in a study focused around 25 simple questions. After analyzing the results of the survey, I was ready to speak about the results from an expert perspective in the book. I gathered together two of my fellow networking experts: Frank DeRaffele, to write from the male perspective; and Hazel Walker to write from the female perspective. Our combined knowledge and experience came together to bring a unique perspective to this innovative book.

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